How to Create a Beautiful Window Trim on a Budget

You can have the most beautiful windows installed but without the right window trim, it’ll just look bland.

Thankfully, you can create your own. Start by removing the existing trim from your window if it already has one. Using a prybar and a hammer, gently remove the window trim to reveal the rough 2×4 window frame.

Now, keep on reading for our full breakdown of how to create a farmhouse-style window trim. You can add it to your DIY projects list.

Building a Window Trim: Take Out Your Boards

Starting with a table saw, you’ll adjust the guard to 3 14″ for the first pass on a 1x4x8 piece.

This adjustment is the time to rip through all of your boards. Then, on the second pass, lower your guard to 3 inches. Make sure you flip the boards over. The rounded edge will be removed, and your wood will have a quality look at a fraction of the cost.

If you already love the window trims you have, but they need some repair, then you can check out Renewal by Andersen Windows & Doors.

Use a Smooth Sander to Finish Your Boards

You should sand your boards using an orbital sander. We usually begin by using an 80 grit sanding pad to remove the most stubborn blemishes.

To avoid rounding the edges you merely cut flat, and sand the sides exceedingly straight. After that, we finish with 120 grit. We don’t use 220 grit since I’m painting and not staining.

Area Measurement

You’ll need to measure the area, door, or window.

To avoid making a mistake, it’s advisable to double-check your measurements before making any cuts. Measuring each item one at a time would be my recommendation since it’s simple to have an error of 18” or 2/8”.

If you’re intending on painting, caulking the little gap won’t be a big deal. Sanding will also cause any gaps to widen. As a result, the first step in eliminating any significant gap is to correctly measure.

We began at the top of my window and worked my way down. For this reason, measure the interior width of your window, then add 3″ on each side to accommodate for trim. A 1″ overhang on each side was also included. My 1x6x8 and 2 – 1x2x8 boards added up to a total width of 36″ + 6″ + 2″ = 44″.

Once you’ve cut all three of those boards, measure the width and depth of the windowsill. To save money, you can utilize a 1x4x8 combined with a 1x2x8 (they’re less costly than a 1x6x8).

You can use this dimension to determine the size of the window’s footer, which will likely be identical to the window’s header. But to be on the safe side, take a second reading.

Measuring the sides will be easier after you have your header and footer ready. Only two brad nails held my header and footer securely in place, allowing me to correctly measure.

Since windows let in so much light, getting a good image of them from the front is almost impossible. However, this is all that you can see out of the pane. Before sanding it down, you can use the pre-installed components to confirm that everything fits.

Initial Cutting and Miter Cutting

Each connecting edge on the baseboard should be mitered at a 45-degree angle. Thus, the seam is “easier to conceal” since it is more compact.

Cut each corner at a 45° angle as well. Don’t forget to flip your wood in such a way that each side meets in the middle. When two straight pieces of wood are attached to a wall, this is the opposite of the connecting seam.

There will be no miter cuts for windows. For the sake of tight seams, however, we made initial cuts (the first cut to remove rough edges on each component end of a board).

There will be no miter cuts for doors. However, we made the first cuts since I wanted the cleanest possible appearance.

Every corner in a room will have a 45° miter cut for Chair Rail. Identical to what is found on the floorboards. Notice the 45-degree turn.

You won’t even see it until it’s filled with caulk or spackle. Farmhouse-style trim may be built in a matter of minutes.

Connect All of the Pieces Together

It’s time to put the header together now that you’ve finished cutting and sanding all your components.

Lay your 1×6 on its side on a level, firm surface. Wood glue (spread it thinly with your finger) should be applied on top of the 1×6 and a 1×2 should be placed on the top edge, making sure the ends are flush. While you’re nailing the two pieces of plywood together, be firm.

Turn the 1×2 over and repeat the procedure with the second.

If you have a hard, level surface, place your 1×4 on its side on the hard surface, apply wood glue (spread it thinly with your finger), lay your 1×2 on the top edge, and ensure that the ends are flush. While you nail the planks together, keep your balance.

Final Stage: Installation

Once the hard work is done, the prize is in sight: a gorgeous farmhouse-style trim. It’s easier to do this with two people, but you can do it all by yourself.

Have your measuring tape in hand, with the 6″ mark on it, and lock it in place. Install the header evenly by holding it up and measuring 4 inches on each side of the window.

Sliding it in from the sides will allow you to keep it flush with your windows. Pop a brad nail in the top to secure it, then work your way down the length of it, being sure to pull it flush with the window’s edge as you go. Then put a couple brads into the exterior of the piece.

When installing the footer, place a 1×2 on top of the 1×4. By pushing it up against the window sill, you may get a flush fit on both sides (the windowsill might need to be sanded down to create flush seams with the footer, mine did). Nail through the 1×4 piece of the 1×2 into the 1×4 portion while holding tightly.

Window Finishing Touches: The DIY Edition

Sometimes, it’s better to DIY a project to get the results that you want, while also saving some money. We hope that our breakdown of how you can make your own window trim has been helpful.

Next step, you’ll want to check out our home improvement section for more DIY projects, and other inspirational posts.

Thankfully, you can create your own. Start by removing the existing trim from your window if it already has one. Using a prybar and a hammer, gently remove the window trim to reveal the rough 2×4 window frame.

Now, keep on reading for our full breakdown of how to create a farmhouse-style window trim. You can add it to your DIY projects list.

Building a Window Trim: Take Out Your Boards

Starting with a table saw, you’ll adjust the guard to 3 14″ for the first pass on a 1x4x8 piece.

This adjustment is the time to rip through all of your boards. Then, on the second pass, lower your guard to 3 inches. Make sure you flip the boards over. The rounded edge will be removed, and your wood will have a quality look at a fraction of the cost.

If you already love the window trims you have, but they need some repair, then you can check out Renewal by Andersen Windows & Doors.

Use a Smooth Sander to Finish Your Boards

You should sand your boards using an orbital sander. We usually begin by using an 80 grit sanding pad to remove the most stubborn blemishes.

To avoid rounding the edges you merely cut flat, and sand the sides exceedingly straight. After that, we finish with 120 grit. We don’t use 220 grit since I’m painting and not staining.

Area Measurement

You’ll need to measure the area, door, or window.

To avoid making a mistake, it’s advisable to double-check your measurements before making any cuts. Measuring each item one at a time would be my recommendation since it’s simple to have an error of 18” or 2/8”.

If you’re intending on painting, caulking the little gap won’t be a big deal. Sanding will also cause any gaps to widen. As a result, the first step in eliminating any significant gap is to correctly measure.

We began at the top of my window and worked my way down. For this reason, measure the interior width of your window, then add 3″ on each side to accommodate for trim. A 1″ overhang on each side was also included. My 1x6x8 and 2 – 1x2x8 boards added up to a total width of 36″ + 6″ + 2″ = 44″.

Once you’ve cut all three of those boards, measure the width and depth of the windowsill. To save money, you can utilize a 1x4x8 combined with a 1x2x8 (they’re less costly than a 1x6x8).

You can use this dimension to determine the size of the window’s footer, which will likely be identical to the window’s header. But to be on the safe side, take a second reading.

Measuring the sides will be easier after you have your header and footer ready. Only two brad nails held my header and footer securely in place, allowing me to correctly measure.

Since windows let in so much light, getting a good image of them from the front is almost impossible. However, this is all that you can see out of the pane. Before sanding it down, you can use the pre-installed components to confirm that everything fits.

Initial Cutting and Miter Cutting

Each connecting edge on the baseboard should be mitered at a 45-degree angle. Thus, the seam is “easier to conceal” since it is more compact.

Cut each corner at a 45° angle as well. Don’t forget to flip your wood in such a way that each side meets in the middle. When two straight pieces of wood are attached to a wall, this is the opposite of the connecting seam.

There will be no miter cuts for windows. For the sake of tight seams, however, we made initial cuts (the first cut to remove rough edges on each component end of a board).

There will be no miter cuts for doors. However, we made the first cuts since I wanted the cleanest possible appearance.

Every corner in a room will have a 45° miter cut for Chair Rail. Identical to what is found on the floorboards. Notice the 45-degree turn.

You won’t even see it until it’s filled with caulk or spackle. Farmhouse-style trim may be built in a matter of minutes.

Connect All of the Pieces Together

It’s time to put the header together now that you’ve finished cutting and sanding all your components.

Lay your 1×6 on its side on a level, firm surface. Wood glue (spread it thinly with your finger) should be applied on top of the 1×6 and a 1×2 should be placed on the top edge, making sure the ends are flush. While you’re nailing the two pieces of plywood together, be firm.

Turn the 1×2 over and repeat the procedure with the second.

If you have a hard, level surface, place your 1×4 on its side on the hard surface, apply wood glue (spread it thinly with your finger), lay your 1×2 on the top edge, and ensure that the ends are flush. While you nail the planks together, keep your balance.

Final Stage: Installation

Once the hard work is done, the prize is in sight: a gorgeous farmhouse-style trim. It’s easier to do this with two people, but you can do it all by yourself.

Have your measuring tape in hand, with the 6″ mark on it, and lock it in place. Install the header evenly by holding it up and measuring 4 inches on each side of the window.

Sliding it in from the sides will allow you to keep it flush with your windows. Pop a brad nail in the top to secure it, then work your way down the length of it, being sure to pull it flush with the window’s edge as you go. Then put a couple brads into the exterior of the piece.

When installing the footer, place a 1×2 on top of the 1×4. By pushing it up against the window sill, you may get a flush fit on both sides (the windowsill might need to be sanded down to create flush seams with the footer, mine did). Nail through the 1×4 piece of the 1×2 into the 1×4 portion while holding tightly.

Window Finishing Touches: The DIY Edition

Sometimes, it’s better to DIY a project to get the results that you want, while also saving some money. We hope that our breakdown of how you can make your own window trim has been helpful.

Next step, you’ll want to check out our home improvement section for more DIY projects, and other inspirational posts.

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